September 22, 2019

Panasonic AG-DVC30E Camcorder 10 PAPER SHanassy AndBHochner Movement Abstract Lesof

Panasonic AG-DVC30E Camcorder 10 PAPER SHanassy AndBHochner Movement Abstract Lesof - page 1

Bioinspir. Biomim.

10

(2015) 035001

doi:10.1088/1748-3190/10/3/035001

PAPER

Stereotypical reaching movements of the octopus involve both bend

propagation and arm elongation

S Hanassy

1

, A Botvinnik

1

, T Flash

2

and B Hochner

1

1

Department of Neurobiology, Silberman Institute of Life Sciences and the Interdisciplinary Center for Neural Computation,

Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

2

Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

E-mail:

[email protected]

Keywords:

neuromuscular system, muscular hydrostat, octopus, invertebrate, motor control, hyper-redundant appendages, reaching

movement

Abstract

The bend propagation involved in the stereotypical reaching movement of the octopus arm has been

extensively studied. While these studies have analyzed the kinematics of bend propagation along the

arm during its extension, possible length changes have been ignored. Here, the elongation pro

les of

the reaching movements of

Octopus vulgaris

were assessed using three-dimensional reconstructions.

The analysis revealed that, in addition to bend propagation, arm extension movements involve

elongation of the proximal part of the arm, i.e., the section from the base of the arm to the propagating

bend. The elongations are quite substantial and highly variable, ranging from an average strain along

the arm of

0.12 (i.e. shortening) up to 1.8 at the end of the movement (0.57 ± 0.41,

n

= 64

movements, four animals). Less variability was discovered in an additional set of experiments on

reaching movements (0.64 ± 0.28,

n

= 30 movements, two animals), where target and octopus

positions were kept more stationary. Visual observation and subsequent kinematic analysis suggest

that the reaching movements can be broadly segregated into two groups. The

rst group involves bend

propagation beginning at the base of the arm and propagating towards the arm tip. In the second, the

bend is formed or present more distally and reaching is achieved mainly by elongation and

straightening of the segment proximal to the bend. Only in the second type of movements is

elongation signi

cantly positively correlated with the distance of the bend from the target. We suggest

that reaching towards a target is generated by a combination of both propagation of a bend along the

arm and arm elongation. These two motor primitives may be combined to create a broad spectrum of

reaching movements. The dynamical model, which recapitulates the biomechanics of the octopus

muscular hydrostatic arm, suggests that achieving the observed elongation requires an extremely low

ratio of longitudinal to transverse muscle force (<0.0016 for an average strain along the arm of around

0.5). This was not observed and moreover such extremely low value does not seem to be

physiologically possible. Hence the assumptions made in applying the dynamic model to behaviors

such as static arm stiffening that leads to arm extension through bend propagation and the patterns of

activation used to simulate such behaviors should be modi

ed to account for movements combining

bend propagation and arm elongation.

Introduction

Octopuses and their relatives, squids and cuttle

sh,

belong to the group of modern Cephalopoda

(Coleoidea), whose eight

exible arms are unique

among mollusks (Hochner

2012

). These constitute a

highly redundant biomechanical structure which has

virtually an in

nite number of degrees of freedom

(DOF). The adaptability, dexterity and maneuver-

ability of octopus arms have attracted considerable

attention from robotic engineers as source of

inspiration for designing and constructing a new

class of

exible robotic arms (Hochner

2012

, Mar-

gheri

et al

2012

).

RECEIVED

23 June 2014

REVISED

13 January 2015

ACCEPTED FOR PUBLICATION

15 January 2015

PUBLISHED

13 May 2015

© 2015 IOP Publishing Ltd




Bioinspir. Biomim. 10 (2015) 035001 doi:10.1088/1748-3190/10/3/035001 PAPER Stereotypical reaching movements of the octopus involve both bend propagation and arm elongation S Hanassy 1 , A Botvinnik 1 , T Flash 2 and B Hochner 1 1 Department of Neurobiology, Silberman Institute of Life Sciences and the Interdisciplinary Center for Neural Computation, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel 2 Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel E-mail: [email protected] Keywords: neuromuscular system, muscular hydrostat, octopus, invertebrate, motor control, hyper-redundant appendages, reaching movement Abstract

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

About The Author

Related posts